Erika Finanger, MD | DuchenneXchange

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Healthcare Providers

Erika Finanger, MD

Healthcare Provider
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
Division of Neurology
Oregon Health & Science University Hospital
3181 S.W., Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon, United States

Dr. Erika Finanger is a specialized pediatric neurologist at Doernbecher Children’s Hospital, Oregon Health & Science University. She also works as an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Neurology.

Dr. Finanger specializes in caring for children with neurologic problems. She has advanced training in neuromuscular neurology, including comprehensive evaluation, medical management, and performance and interpretation of electrodiagnostic studies (EMG/NCS – electromyelogram/nerve conduction studies). Dr. Finanger is also involved in clinical research related to pediatric neuromuscular conditions.

She received her medical degree from Mayo Medical School, Rochester Minnesota and completed her residency and fellowship in neuromuscular neurology from Johns Hopkins Hospital. She holds certification in Neurology with a special qualification in child neurology from the American Board of Neurology and Psychiatry.

 

Representative Publications:

Examination of effects of corticosteroids on skeletal muscles of boys with DMD using MRI and MRS

Multicenter Prospective Longitudinal Study of Magnetic Resonance Biomarkers in a Large Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Cohort

Longitudinal timed function tests in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Imaging DMD cohort natural history

Skeletal muscle magnetic resonance biomarkers correlate with function and sentinel events in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Multicenter prospective longitudinal study of magnetic resonance biomarkers in a large duchenne muscular dystrophy cohort

Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy assessment of lower extremity skeletal muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a multicenter cross sectional study

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